Law Pod UK


New Podcast! Brexit and the Flaws of the Delegated Legislation System

4 November 2020 by

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In Episode 129, Emma-Louise Fenelon speaks to Joe Tomlinson and Alexandra Sinclair, authors of the new Public Law Project report: Plus ca change? Brexit and the flaws of the delegated legislation system. They are joined by Lord Anderson of Ipswich QC for a fascinating discussion about parliamentary goings-on in a time of Brexit.

The Public Law Project is an independent national charity carrying out research, policy work, training and legal case work to promote the rule of law, improve decision making and facilitate access to justice. The PLP takes no position on the UK’s decision to leave the EU.

Joe is Research Director at the PLP. He is also Senior Lecturer in Public Law at the University of York. He researches widely on public law, and particularly the administrative justice system and his work has been published in leading journals and cited by a variety of bodies, including the Ministry of Justice, the All Party Parliamentary Group on the Rule of Law, and the House of Commons Library. His work, with Professor Robert Thomas, on administrative review will also form the basis of a Law Commission project.

Alexandra is a Research Fellow at the Public Law Project and a PhD student at the London School of Economics Faculty of Law.  She has worked as a judges’ clerk at the New Zealand High Court and as a barrister in Auckland, New Zealand. She was awarded the Cleary Memorial Prize by the New Zealand Law Foundation in 2015 for showing outstanding promise in the legal profession.

David Anderson will be well known to listeners. He is a barrister at Brick Court Chambers and a Cross Bench Peer. Following him on twitter @bricksilk is highly recommended to anyone with an interest in public law.

For those interested in public law more generally, signing up to the Public Law Project mailing list is also worthwhile.

Law Pod UK is available on Spotify, Apple PodcastsAudioboomPlayer FM,  ListenNotesPodbeaniHeartRadio PublicDeezer 
or wherever you listen to our podcasts.

Please remember to rate and review us if you like what you hear.

The last Novichok poisoning: Law Pod UK

6 September 2020 by

The Russian political dissident Alexei Navalny is still in an induced coma in a hospital in Berlin after being poisoned with the nerve agent Novichok on a flight from Siberia to Moscow on the 20th of August. The last time we heard of this lethal organophosphate was two years ago when two Russian residents in Salsibury, Wiltshire, survived an assassination attempt. Dawn Sturgess, who lived eight miles away, was not so lucky. She died after spraying herself with a discarded bottle of the poison which she thought to contain perfume.

At her inquest, the senior coroner declined to extend the scope of his investigation to the involvement of the Russian state in her death as collateral damage to the assassination attempt. Her family took judicial review proceedings to challenge his conclusion. They were partially successful; the court said the although the coroner couldn’t state, in terms, that the Russian state was liable in civil or criminal law, he could still investigate that matter. They reverted the matter to him. Read the judgment of the Administrative Court on the 24th of July here.

The senior coroner, who must now ask if answering how Ms Sturgess died requires him to look at involvement of Russian state. In the latest episode of Law Pod UK Rosalind English discusses the broader implications of this case with Matt Hill of 1 Crown Office Row. (Apologies – due to a technical error, the wrong episode was posted under “The Salisbury Poisonings” yesterday. The correct episode is now in place.


Law Pod UK is available on 
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Law Pod UK is back! With Joshua Rozenberg

1 September 2020 by

After a summer hiatus, Law Pod UK returns with an interview with Joshua Rozenberg who will be well known to listeners as a legal commentator, journalist, and presenter of the BBC’s Law in Action.

In Episode 123 Joshua addresses attacks on judges and lawyers by the media and the government, and discusses his new book Enemies of the People? How Judges Shape Society

This interview was recorded the day after the Home Office released a post on social media suggesting that “activist lawyers” were abusing regulations by delaying and disrupting returns of migrants. The Law Society and Bar Council both condemned the video, and it has since been taken down by the Home Office, see here.

For links to the cases discussed, see below:

  • The recent New Zealand High Court decision concerning the lawfulness of the first 9 days of lockdown in New Zealand here (for an analysis, see UK Human Rights Blog article here.
  • Read more about Simon Dolan’s challenge to lockdown, represented by Philip Havers QC, here.

Listeners can avail of 20% discount on the retail price of Joshua Rozenberg’s book, linked on Joshua’s blog here.

New Podcast Episode: Secondary Victim Claims update with Gideon Barth

28 July 2020 by

In Episode 122, Emma-Louise Fenelon speaks to Gideon Barth about secondary victim claims, and the recent case of Paul v Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust [2020] EWHC 1415.

This episode also discusses the following cases:

The podcast will be taking a break until September. We wish all our listeners happy socially distanced holidays.

Law Pod UK is available on Spotify, Apple PodcastsAudioboomPlayer FM,  ListenNotesPodbeaniHeartRadio PublicDeezer or wherever you listen to our podcasts.

Please remember to rate and review us if you like what you hear.

New Episode of Law Pod UK: the Gerry Adams case

23 July 2020 by

The recent ruling by the Supreme Court that the former leader of Sinn Féin had been unlawfully detained and convicted in the 1970s has elicited some severe criticism from high places, including former Supreme Court judge Jonathan Sumption. Matt Hill of 1 Crown Office Row discusses this case with Rosalind English in the latest episode of Law Pod UK. Matt has worked on a number of cases relating to the Troubles in Northern Ireland. He was involved as an in historian on the Bloody Sunday Inquiry, was junior counsel to the Inquiry on the recent Birmingham pub bombing inquests, and has written about the use of inquiries and inquests in dealing with the legacy of the Troubles. The discussion focusses on the so-called “Carltona” principle regarding the responsibility of ministers to consider each function of administration. Lord Sumption has said that the Supreme Court ruling in the Adams case has “left the law in an awful mess”.

Law Pod UK is available on Spotify, Apple PodcastsAudioboomPlayer FM,  ListenNotesPodbeaniHeartRadio PublicDeezer or wherever you listen to our podcasts.

Please remember to rate and review us if you like what you hear.

Law Pod UK: Catherine Barnard on the latest in the Brexit negotiations

15 July 2020 by

After something of an hiatus occasioned by the Covid-19 pandemic, we are delighted to welcome Catherine Barnard back onto our podcast with her clear and informative account of the legal steps towards Brexit.

In the latest episode of her podcast 2903cb, Professor Barnard talks to journalist Boni Sones about the latest in the trade talks. What is happening with the timetables and deals to get the UK out of the EU by the end of this year? Tune in to Episode 120 of Law Pod UK to find out.

Law Pod UK is available on Spotify, Apple PodcastsAudioboomPlayer FM,  ListenNotesPodbeaniHeartRadio PublicDeezer or wherever you listen to our podcasts.

Please remember to rate and review us if you like what you hear.

LawPod UK: Dentists and Covid-19

6 July 2020 by

The spotlight during the pandemic has been on frontline workers in the medical profession. But if you think of it, the real hazards are to be found in the dentist’s surgery, where most interactions with patients involve an operation in the mouth, whether it be drilling, cleaning or extraction. Most of what a dentist or a dental hygienist does is what has become widely known as an AGP – “aerosol generating procedure”.

In the latest episode of Law Pod UK Rosalind English talks to the head of indemnity at the British Dental Association Len D’Cruz about the challenges facing the dental profession during lockdown and the even greater hurdles to be faced after dentists resumed practice on the 8th of June 2020.

Law Pod UK is available on Spotify, Apple PodcastsAudioboomPlayer FM,  ListenNotesPodbeaniHeartRadio PublicDeezer or wherever you listen to our podcasts.

Please remember to rate and review us if you like what you hear.

Systemic Racial Inequality: Windrush and the Bar on Law Pod UK with Martin Forde QC

26 June 2020 by

It is now over a month since the death of George Floyd. 

The UK Human Rights Blog and Law Pod are committed to continuing the conversation about racism in the UK prompted by his death and the Black Lives Matter protests.

Michael Paulin has discussed a number of issues in his recent article.

The beginning of this week marked Windrush Day, introduced in June 2018 on the 70th anniversary of the Windrush migration, to celebrate the contribution of the Windrush Generation and their descendants to Britain. In Episode 117, Emma-Louise Fenelon speaks to Martin Forde QC, Independent Adviser to the Windrush Compensation Scheme about racial inequality in the UK, in immigration history and at the Bar. The Counsel magazine front cover interview with Martin Forde QC in their June Issue is available here.


Law Pod UK is available on 
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Food security and farming beauty: the Agriculture Bill

8 June 2020 by

In the latest episode of Law Pod UK, Rosalind English discusses the Agriculture Bill with Peter Stevenson, senior policy advisor to the campaign organisation Compassion in World Farming. We have chosen the rearing of food animals as our focus for this interview because of the circumstances in which the current pandemic is said to have arisen; the zoonotic event of an animal virus passing to humans in the pathogen-rich wet markets of China. Intensively farmed “wildlife” may sound an alien concept, if not something of an oxymoron, but the dangers of industrial farming of animals are becoming increasingly apparent in the West.

The main concern is that there are no provisions in the framework bill to protect UK food producers from being undercut by imported food from countries where standards of animal welfare and hygiene do not apply.

See Rafe Jenning’s post on the salient features of the Agriculture Bill 2020 for more details about its provisions for “public money for public goods”, Environmental Land Management Schemes that promote these goods such as improvements to soil health, pollinator density and biodiversity, all activities that the market does not sufficiently incentivise.

Law Pod UK is available on Spotify, Apple PodcastsAudioboomPlayer FM,  ListenNotesPodbeaniHeartRadio PublicDeezer or wherever you listen to our podcasts.

Please remember to rate and review us if you like what you hear.

LawPod UK examines fall in rape prosecutions

1 June 2020 by

Since 2017 the rate and volume of rape prosecutions in the UK have fallen steeply, collapsing to the lowest level since records began.  The reasons for this are unclear.

In Episode 114 of Law Pod UK, Emma-Louise Fenelon speaks to Jennifer MacLeod from Brick Court Chambers about two judgments recently handed down by the Divisional Court concerning challenges brought against different aspects of CPS rape prosecution policy: 

R (EVAW) v Director of Public Prosecutions [2020] EWHC 929 (Admin)

(FNM) v Director of Public Prosecutions [2020] EWHC 870 (Admin)

Alice Kuzmenko discusses the FNM decision on the UKhuman rights blog here.


Law Pod UK is available on Spotify, Apple PodcastsAudioboomPlayer FM,  ListenNotesPodbeaniHeartRadio PublicDeezer or wherever you listen to our podcasts.

Please remember to rate and review us if you like what you hear.

Tracking Coronavirus Symptoms

26 May 2020 by

The new contact tracing app (NHSX) is due to be rolled out in the rest of the UK some time after the Isle of Wight trial in May. Is this a way out of lockdown or an irreversible erosion of our privacy? In the latest episode of Law Pod UK Rosalind English talks to Professor Lilian Edwards of Newcastle University, whose Coronavirus (Safeguards) Bill 2020 seeks to address some of these concerns, particularly potential issues of coercion and discrimination. See our previous post reporting on the Webinar “The Covid-19 App – does it threaten privacy rights”  held by Professor Edwards and others on 13 May.


Law Pod UK is available on 
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Please remember to rate and review us if you like what you hear.

New Strasbourg Court President on AI and the law

22 May 2020 by

In the latest episode of Law Pod UK, Robert Spano, who recently commenced his tenure as President of the European Court of Human Rights in the difficult circumstances of lockdown and remote working, discusses with Rosalind English the challenges we face with automated decision making and governmental interference with our lives. The pandemic has sharpened this question, as the lifting of restrictions is made contingent on various automated projects such as the contact tracing app, which we will be considering in the next episode. Spano explains that rapid advances in AI will not just require new legal and regulatory responses. Artificial intelligence will also fundamentally alter the institutional capacities and legitimacy of courts as sources of governance. How will AI reshape our understandings and implementations of law? How will it reshape the internal workings of courts? Listen to Episode 112 to find out more.


Law Pod UK is available on 
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Please remember to rate and review us if you like what you hear.

Covid-19 and Inquests: an update with Peter Skelton QC on Law Pod UK

10 May 2020 by


In Episode 111 Emma-Louise Fenelon discusses with Peter Skelton QC the recent changes in legislation and guidance concerning the Coronial jurisdiction since the outbreak of Covid-19 and the ways in which Coroners and practitioners are rising to meet the challenges faced in lockdown.

The four most recent Guidance Notes published by the Coroner can be found below, along with a link to the most recent issue of the QMLR:

Guidance Note 34

Guidance Note 35

Guidance Note 36

Guidance Note 37

Quarterly Medical Law Review (QMLR) Special Issue

Law Pod UK is available on Spotify, Apple PodcastsAudioboomPlayer FM,  ListenNotesPodbeaniHeartRadio PublicDeezer or wherever you listen to our podcasts.

Please remember to rate and review us if you like what you hear.

Commercial surrogacy arrangements – within or without the law?

1 May 2020 by

In the latest episode of Law Pod UK, Rosalind English talks to William Edis QC of 1 Crown Office Row about the recent Supreme Court ruling on whether damages can be claimed against the NHS in respect of a commercial surrogacy arrangement in California, following the admitted negligence of a hospital in the UK rendering the respondent unable to bear a child. See Bill’s post on that ruling here.

Commercial surrogacy agreements – that is where the surrogate makes a profit for bearing the commissioning mother’s child – are against the law in this country. But it is not illegal to travel, so those with the means to do so can go to another jurisdiction where such arrangements are common practice. An interesting legal conundrum arose where a woman sought damages for such an arranged surrogacy in the States where a UK hospital, by its own admitted negligence, had rendered her unable to have a child. Here are the relevant laws and cases referred to in the podcast episode:

Surrogacy Arrangements Act 1985

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990, section 27; Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008, section 33

Briody v St Helens [2001]

XX v Whittington Hospital NHS Trust [2018] EWCA Civ 2832

Whittington Hospital NHS Trust (Appellant) v XX (Respondent) [2020] UKSC 14


Law Pod UK is available on 
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Law Pod UK episode on medical law developments

28 April 2020 by

In the latest Law Pod UK episode, Emma-Louise Fenelon speaks to Rajkiran Barhey about the the most recent issue of the Quarterly Law Medical Review.

The QMLR covers developments in medical law in the broadest sense – clinical negligence, inquest, regulatory, judicial review and court of protection cases.

In Episode 109 we touch on some of the highlights from the most recent issue including articles from: 
John Whitting QC on causation, 
Suzanne Lambert on informed consent, 
Jeremy Hyam QC on gender reassignment in prison, 
Rajkiran Barhey on NICE Guidelines and the use of screens in inquests, and Jo Moore on the recent changes to statements of truth and witness statements. 

The following cases are mentioned in this episode:

Get the latest case updates by following on twitter @1corQMLR and find previous issues on the 1COR website under ‘Newsletter’.


Law Pod UK is available on 
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Please remember to rate and review us if you like what you hear.

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