The biggest human rights stories of 2012 – Part 3

UKHRB 2012 year in review

Happy new year! I hope that none of your new year’s eves were ruined by worrying when the next instalment of my year in review would arrive in your inboxes. Anyway, here we go with July to September.

If you need to catch up:

Now on to Part 3…

July (read all posts)

  • The freedom not to believeIn a fascinating judgment, the Supreme Court ruled that it is no answer to a refugee claim to say that the individual concerned should avoid persecution by lying and feigning loyalty to a regime which s/he does not support.
  • Newspapers in contempt of court -The Attorney General was certainly proactive in enforcing contempt of court rules in 2012. In this case, the High Court found that articles about Levi Bellfield, Millie Dowler’s murderer, were in contempt of court

August (read all posts)

  • Assange keeps us interested -August is traditionally a quiet time in the legal calendar as the higher courts shut for business (so few judgments). But an intrepid band of UK legal bloggers were kept busy by Wikileaks founder Julian Assange and the legal issues surrounding his sojourn at the Ecuadorian embassy: The Assange Reality Distortion Field
  • Judges banned from blogging – unless they do it anonymously. I said the move was shortsighted and that judicial blogging should be seen as an opportunity rather than a threat.

September (read all posts)

  • Abu Hamza finally extradited to USA - … after his application to appeal to the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights was turned down. But why did it take so long?
  • Indefinite detention is bad - In an important judgment of principle, the European Court of Human Rights ruled that the UK violated the Article 5(1) ECHR rights of three prisoners sentenced to indeterminate sentences for public protection, where reasonable provision for their rehabilitation was not made.
  • All change at the top - Former lawyer Ken Clarke out as Justice Secretary and Lord Chancellor, non-lawyer Chris Grayling in. British Sir Nicolas Bratza out as European Court of Human Rights President, Luxembourgish (if that’s the right adjective) Dean Spielman in

Part 4, October to December, is here.

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