Brexit and Fundamental Rights – Podcast Available

1 Crown Office Row recently collaborated with Leigh Day for a special event entitled:

‘Brexit and Fundamental Rights’

The discussion was chaired by Joshua Rozenberg QC.

Speaking from 1COR were Adam Wagner, Jeremy Hyam QC, Dominic Ruck Keene and Hannah Noyce.

Nigel Mackay, employment specialist at Leigh Day, also joined the panel and Sean Humber, partner and head of human rights, introduced the event.

You can download the podcast here.

 

Fake news, human rights and access to justice – 2017 Human Rights Lecture

https---cdn.evbuc.com-images-28088481-148457149211-1-original.jpg.pngI am honoured to be giving the 2017 Equality and Human Rights Commission Annual Human Rights Lecture this year. The title speaks for itself!

Venue: Cardiff Law School, Cardiff University, Law Building, Museum Ave, Cardiff, CF10 3AX

Date and time: Tuesday 7th March 2017
Tea and coffee – from 5.00pm
Lecture – 6-7.15pm

You can book a (free) place here

 

Barbican brexit event – last-minute tickets

20 tickets have become available for tonight’s event at the Barbican, at which Leigh Day and 1 Crown Office Row will be collaborating to bring you a stimulating discussion of the potential impact of Brexit on human rights.

If you were previously unable to reserve a place and would like to attend, please email me at Rebecca.King@1cor.com to reserve a place.  The 20 remaining spaces will be allocated on a “first come, first served” basis.

If you would like to follow discussions online, please follow the #BREXITrights hashtag on twitter.  Please also get in touch by email if you would like to receive a podcast of the event.  Hope to see you there!

Simplicity could have been a virtue for the well-meaning PSNI…

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Sometimes, in law as in life, keeping things simple is the best approach. Unfortunately for the Police Service of Northern Ireland (‘PSNI’), the Supreme Court found in DB v Chief Constable of PSNI [2017] UKSC 7 that the Force had made both the law and its life, in policing parades in Belfast, more complicated than it needed to be.

This appeal from a judicial review decision was all about the PSNI’s powers, and its understanding of its own powers, to police illegal parades in Belfast. Fittingly, the judgement was delivered by Lord Kerr, Northern Ireland’s former Lord Chief Justice, who (as Wikipedia reliably tells me) is an alumni of Queen’s University, Belfast. The underlying facts will be familiar to anyone with a passing interest in the knock-about politics of Northern Ireland and they drew on those most pressing of issues there: parades and flags.
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Brexit and Fundamental Rights

1 Crown Office Row are very pleased to be collaborating with Human Rights specialists Leigh Day on a special event to explore how Brexit will impact the fundamental rights of people based in the UK.

The event will be held at the Barbican on February 2nd 2017.

Joshua Rozenberg QC will chair the event.  The speakers are Adam Wagner (Founder of UK Human Rights Blog and the Human Rights media charity, Rights Info), Jeremy Hyam QC, Dominic Ruck Keene and Hannah Noyce.

Spaces are now fully taken up, however if you would like to follow discussions online please follow the #BREXITrights hashtag on twitter.

If you have questions you would like answered in the Q and A session after the talks, or would like to receive a podcast of the event, then please email Rebecca.king@1cor.com.

The Round Up – Article 50 and the first few days with Trump

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The government trumped

Tuesday’s Supreme Court judgment held by a majority of 8 to 3 that an Act of Parliament is required to authorise ministers to give Notice of the decision of the UK to withdraw from the European Union.  This blog has covered the case in some detail – see Dominic Ruck-Keene’s post on the central issue in the appeal here, Jim Duffy’s post regarding the court’s findings on the status of the Sewel Convention here, and Rosie Slowe’s guest post on the enduring relevance of the question of the irrevocability or otherwise of an Article 50 notification here.

Trump’s inauguration trumped…but what now?

Donald Trump’s inauguration was met with a rather lukewarm reception on 21st January 2017 when almost 5 million people took to the streets to join the globally organised Women’s March.

The event is estimated to have attracted approximately 4.8 million people across 673 marches. It was organised in support of all those who had been targeted during Trump’s election campaign: not just women, but migrants of all statuses, Muslims and those of diverse religious faiths, people who identify as LGBTQ, people of racial minorities, and people with disabilities.

Trump himself seems untroubled by the protests, and responded the following day with a purportedly liberal and tolerant tweet: ‘Peaceful protests are a hallmark of our democracy. Even if I don’t always agree, I recognize the rights of people to express their views’.

Moreover, in no way has he been deterred from his objectives regarding certain women’s rights. Continue reading

Defying convention: Supreme Court puts Sewel on the sidelines

unknownIn the new age of alternative facts, even Sean Spicer might struggle to spin Tuesday’s Supreme Court judgment as anything other than a comprehensive defeat for the government.

Yet, as my colleague Dominic Ruck Keene’s post alluded to, the ultimate political ramifications of Miller would have made the Article 50 process appreciably more turgid had the Justices accepted the various arguments relating to devolution.

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