Family courts guide to Media Access & Reporting

29 July 2011 by

Updated | The family courts in conjunction with the Judicial College and the Society of Editors have has published a Guide to Media Access and Reporting. It has been written by two barristers, Adam Wolanski and Kate Wilson.

It seeks to address “the tension between concerns about “secret justice” and legitimate expectations of privacy and confidentiality for the family (update – read Lucy Series’ analysis with a focus on Court of Protection cases).

This is interesting and, on a quick glance through the detailed document, useful. Family judges have been critical of journalists’ reporting of sensitive cases recently, and this guide is clearly an attempt to guide judges on what can and can not be reported, and journalists on how to report responsibly. The guide would benefit from a contents page and executive summary, but aside from that it will no doubt prove useful to practitioners and journalists.

One line I am predictably fond of: “Although it remains a matter for the judge, senior members of the judiciary have encouraged the making of public judgments

View this document on Scribd

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1 comment;


  1. anyachaika says:

    I understand the need for Family Courts to balance the concerns about “secret justice” with privacy and confidentiality. However, Family Courts which were less secret may have prevented hundreds of children from being placed in circumstances that are described here –

    http://anyachaika.wordpress.com/2011/07/29/first-audio-account-of-holding-therapy/

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