9/11 and the human rights ripple effects

10 September 2010 by

9/11 attack man accused gets compensationTomorrow is the 9th anniversary of the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks, and it is worth considering some of the after effects which are still being felt in the UK courts.

Our posts on the human rights law relating to terrorism  can be found here. The fact that it is the blog’s largest legal category  is a reflection on the difficulties which the court have found in approaching anti-terrorism law. This relates to the previous government’s often controversial anti-terrorism policies, many of which have been successfully challenged in the courts, as well as the effects of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Particular posts of interest are:

The ripple effect from Guantanamo Bay to the English courts: Isabel McArdle reviews a new academic article by C.R.G Murray at Newcastle University. He analyses the interesting and important line of case-law arising from claims by men detained in Guantanamo Bay.

Terror law reviewers seeking consultation: The new government is currently undertaking a review of anti-terrorism legislation, and Liberty, the human rights organisation, have been asked to contribute.

End of the age of terrorism for human rights campaigners: Army generals are notorious for fighting the last war instead of the current one. Human rights campaigners may be in danger of the same mistake if they get their strategy wrong for the new coalition government.

Control orders quashed, compensation claims may follow: The Court of Appeal has held that control orders of three men suspected of terrorism revoked by the Government should in fact be quashed altogether. One of the various controversial anti-terrorism measures which were passed by the last government and have been successfully challenged in the courts on human rights grounds.

Judicial review as to the need for a single inquiry into Iraqi torture allegations to go ahead, says High Court: Permission has been given to around 100 Iraqi applicants to bring proceedings to compel the Secretary of State to hold a single public inquiry to investigate breaches of Article 3 in relation to each of the claimants with respect to their treatment whilst in detention in Iraq.

Supporting terrorism and the criminal law: The criminalisation of support for terrorist organisations has arisen in various domestic and international contexts recently, and it is likely that the issue will continue to attract controversy as states attempt to trace the boundaries of what can fairly be considered “support” for terrorism, and risk criminal legislation unjustifiably infringing on human rights.

Pilot accused of 9/11 plot entitled to compensation: Lotfi Raissi, a pilot accused of being one of the 9/11 plotters, has been told by the Ministry of Justice that he is entitled to compensation for the effect that the accusations have had on his life.

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